All Courses

Accounting

ACC 125 Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite(s): ACC 120

This course continues the focus on the application of accounting principles inside the enterprise, i.e., the proprietorship, the partnership, and the corporation. It also includes the use of accounting topics such as budgeting, job costing, and break-even analysis to aid in the planning, controlling, and evaluation of company performance.

This course is offered in the Spring.

ACC 120 Accounting I (3)

This course introduces the main aspects of accounting structure and principles as presented in the form of the balance sheet equation, followed by the logical development of the subject of debits and credits, journal entries, special journals, and specific account classifications. The course provides a thorough review of how accounting transactions affect financial statements and their analysis.

This course is offered in the Fall.

Biology

BIO 105 Environmental Biology (3)

This is an interdisciplinary course exploring the complex relationship between the major groups of living organisms. It examines the physical and biological systems of Earth from the perspective of ecology and considers populations and communities of organisms in terms of their relationships with the environment and other organisms, rather than individuals. The course facilitates critical questioning about global and regional environmental issues, current and future energy issues, sustainable development, and viability of green initiatives.

This course is offered in the Spring and Summer.

BIO 110 Human Biology (3)

This course is an introduction to human body systems with the repeated demonstration of the interconnection between structure and function. It includes a general study of the basic principles of chemistry as related to biological function; an overview of cellular structure and metabolism; the general study of selected organ systems; the impacts of globalization on human health; and exploration of medical and research technologies impacting society, including cloning, genetic engineering, stem cell research, and gene therapy.

This course is offered in the Fall and Summer.

BIO 111 Human Biology Lab (1)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 110

This course is a laboratory investigation of the concepts covered in BIO 110 including the nature of the chemistry of life, cell and tissue dynamics, the structure and physiology of selected human organ systems, and an exploration of human genetics with biotechnology applications.

This course is offered in the Fall and Summer.

BIO 120 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3)

Students in this course participate in a study of the anatomy, physiology, and systems of homeostasis, at both the gross and microscopic level, of the human body which emphasizes the structure-function relationship found throughout. Specific topics covered include cell and tissue dynamics including water balance and tissue morphology; the integumentary system; the skeletal system, joints, and bone metabolism; the muscular system; the nervous system and the special and somatic senses.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

BIO 121 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (1)

Prerequisite(s): BIO 120

This course requires a series of laboratory investigations that explore the concepts from BIO 120, including chemical principles that govern living systems; the use of microscopes to examine cells and tissues; the structural and functional characteristics of cells and tissues; and the structure and functional characteristics of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system with general and special senses.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

Business

BUS 105 Business Foundations (3)

This course provides the foundation for the business program, helping students to gain a solid understanding of the components of a business, its external environment, and the interactions between them. Students will engage in decision making and problem-solving exercises. Ethics, leadership, employee empowerment, the impact of technology, and the global market are also explored. Students will develop critical thinking, written and oral communication, and team skills through case-based learning and a term project.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

BUS 220 Principles of Marketing (3)

This course helps students to understand and apply the fundamentals of marketing from a global perspective. The examination of buyer behavior, marketing research, marketing planning, as well as societal, consumer and ethical issues of marketing are examined through readings, experiential exercises, class discussions, and a comprehensive marketing planning project.

This course is offered in the Fall of even calendar years.

BUS 230 Principles of Management (3)

This course introduces students to the principles of management. From the organizational and behavioral aspects to process and management techniques of everyday business, this course is designed to give students social, historical, legal, economic, and environmental knowledge, and an understanding of today’s complex business world.

This course is offered in the Spring of odd calendar years.

BUS 240 Business Law (3)

This course addresses the global, political, social, environmental, and regulatory legal issues confronting businesses. Students will explore important topics in business law, including entity formation, corporations, contracts, agency, and other topical areas. Because decision making at all levels in the firm must take legal consequences into account, the study of the legal environment requires and develops critical thinking skills, logic, and reasoning.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

Chemistry

CHM 110 Introduction to Chemistry (3)

This course is a survey of the properties of matter that include atomic theory, electron configurations, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, properties of the phases of matter, stoichiometry, and thermochemistry. The course emphasizes experimental techniques and technology used to measure and quantify matter.

This course is offered in the Fall of odd calendar years.

CHM 111 Introduction to Chemistry Lab (1)

Prerequisite(s): CHM 110

This course is a laboratory investigation of the techniques and technology discussed in CHM 110 to focus on the nature of elements, phases of the elements, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and chemical bonding.

This course is offered in the Fall of odd calendar years.

Computer Information Systems

CIS 150 Business Technology I (3)

CIS 250 Business Technology II (3)

Prerequisite(s): CIS 150

CIS 150 Business Technology I (3)

This course is a hands-on introduction to the application of personal computers in a modern, networked business environment, including introduction to the Windows operating system, use of the Internet, and the components of Microsoft Office, with emphasis on Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

This course is offered in the Fall and Spring.

CIS 250 Business Technology II (3)

Prerequisite(s): CIS 150

This course picks up from where CIS 150 leaves off, providing a more thorough exploration of the components of Microsoft Office, including Outlook, Publisher, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

This course is offered in the Spring.

Criminal Justice

CRJ 240 Criminal Justice Ethics (3)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110

This course is an introduction to the application of ethical theories relevant to the practice of the criminal justice system. The course is designed to focus on and emphasize the most significant moral issues faced by criminal justice professionals today. The student is required to conduct a detailed examination of these issues and to apply the various ethical theories, codes, and canons to arrive at a moral decision.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

CRJ 245 Cyber Crime (3)

This course introduces students to the evolution of cyber society, cyber-crime and cybersecurity. It will provide a broad overview of history, socio-political relations, economics, social structure and culture in cyber space. It also examines types of cyber offenses. Students in this course will gain familiarity with laws designed to control cyber-crime and terminology associated with cybercrimes.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of odd calendar years.

CRJ 250 Investigation (3)

This course examines the forensic science field through exploration of its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory. The course focuses on the application of science to criminal and civil laws enforced by agencies in the criminal justice system and is designed to familiarize the student with the most current technologies in forensic analysis that private agencies, police, and law enforcement professionally rely on to approach criminal perpetrators and to link them through trace evidence to crime scenes.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

CRJ 260 Substantive Criminal Justice Law (3)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 235

This course is a generic study of criminal law in the United States and does not cover any specific federal or state law. Topics include principles of criminal law, principles of criminal liability, complicity, inchoate crimes, defenses, justifications, excuses, crimes against persons, crimes against property, and crimes against public order.

This course is offered in the Fall.

CRJ 285 Criminal Justice Practicum (3)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 200, CRL 230, and CRJ 235

This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in participant observation, task performance, or other related activities in an agency of the criminal justice system. A 60-hour field placement is required in addition to attendance at scheduled seminars and/or class meetings.

This course is offered in the Spring.

CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

This course introduces students to the field of the American criminal justice system through the examination of police, courts, and corrections. It includes a review of historical data, statistical information, and evaluation of criminal justice system policies, procedures, and trends. Students learn the terminology of the field, gain an awareness of the methods of inquiry used in the field, and examine attitudes and values regarding crime and responses to crime.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

CRJ 200 Corrections (3)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110

This course provides an analysis of punishment in our criminal justice system, with focus on why we punish and how we punish, all examined within the context of correction philosophies. The history and development of corrections, including relevant theories, practices, systems analysis, and treatment modalities is evaluated.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

CRJ 225 Criminology (3)

This course is designed to provide an overview of the scientific study of crime as a social phenomenon of criminal behavior. Criminological theory will be addressed from a sociological perspective. Major schools of thought will be discussed utilizing the founders of each school and supplementing their premises with supporting criminology research.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of even calendar years.

CRJ 230 Police Function (3)

This course is an introduction to American policing with an analytical framework for understanding the police as a product of a balance of social, historical, political, legal, individual, and organizational forces. It examines theoretical propositions about the police and analyzes the three major functions of policing in the United States: law enforcement, service provision, and the maintenance of order. Legalities involved in policing and police administration are explored in relation to contemporary issues that pose substantial challenges to police officers and administrators.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of odd calendar years.

CRJ 235 Criminal Law and Procedure (3)

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 110

This course examines the dynamic balance of the power of the government (to enforce the criminal law) against the rights of the individual to come and go as they please without government interference. Additionally, the course examines judicial review, constitutional supremacy, and the protections of state constitutional rights concerning criminal procedure as related to federal constitutional protections. The course will cover the area of search and seizure law, its current status as well as its historical development (through the tracing of case law); the ever-changing laws on interrogation, confessions, identifications, and courtroom procedures, such as right to counsel, right to jury trials, the laws governing sentencing and direct and collateral attacks on convictions. It also includes a review of the remedies afforded by law to an individual when the government violates the rights its constitution and statutes provides.

This course is offered in the Spring.

Early Childhood Education

ECE 232 Child Development: Ages 5-10 (3)

This course provides a broad study of child development theories and concepts from kindergarten through fourth grade. Pre-service teachers explore the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development of typical and atypical children from kindergarten through fourth grade. An emphasis on developmentally appropriate practices in the primary grades is explored through analysis of video vignettes.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of even calendar years.

ECE 216 Social & Emotional Growth of Infants & Toddlers (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

The course focuses on social and emotional development, including the management of emotions and the ability to establish positive relationships with others. The importance of, and mechanisms for establishing, engagement, and connections with infants and toddlers is emphasized. The course explores development of behavioral assessments and effective positive behavioral support plans for infants and toddlers. The elements present in a childcare setting that supports healthy social, emotional, and behavioral adjustment in infants and toddlers are examined. A 20-hour observation, provided through field experience or alternate video review, is required.

This course is offered in the Fall.

ECE 120 Instructional and Classroom Design for Early Childhood Curricula (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances

This course introduces pre-service teachers to best practices in creating and managing instruction in the early childhood learning environment. The course fosters quality teaching and learning through lesson development designed to connect learning theories, academic standards, subject content, the learning process, student achievement, assessment of student learning, and arrangement of the classroom environment for improved instruction. Effective strategies for classroom behavior management that promote a safe, respectful learning environment are emphasized. A 40-hour field experience provided through field experience or alternate video review is required.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

ECE 234 Toddler Physical & Cognitive Development: 12-36 Months (3)

The course emphasizes the sequence of developmental milestones expected for children from 12 to 36 months old. Sensory, fine and gross motor, language, and other cognitive development concerns for typical and atypical children from 12 to 36 months are explored.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of even calendar years.

ECE 105 Psychology of Teaching and Learning (3)

This course explores the nature of learning, theories of motivation, and cultural and individual differences found in the classroom which affect learning. Through an investigation of behaviorist, cognitivist, constructivist, and social psychology perspectives and approaches, pre-service teachers explore how to apply concepts and principles of psychology to educational settings in field experiences.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of off calendar years.

ECE 110 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)

This course examines the structure of early childhood education. Social and cultural foundations are addressed in the context of interpersonal relationships among children, families, and communities. An introduction to curricular approaches, observation, and assessment of young children, play, and developmentally appropriate practices is provided. Embedded within this course are requirements for both field placements at NPRC and professional positions within Pennsylvania’s Early Learning programs including clearances, mandated reporter certification, and completion of an online health and safety basics module. Assignments and outcomes within this course are aligned to portfolio components for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential.

This course is offered in the Fall.

ECE 118 Family Involvement and Collaboration (3)

This course examines the symbiotic relationship between family and care environments while emphasizing a team approach utilizing family, educational and childcare providers, and community resources to promote early development and learning. Focus is placed on practical components of family involvement that teachers encounter, effective home and educational provider communications, parent and teacher conferences, facilitation of connections with community resources, administrative issues, and challenges with family involvement in the educational system. Assignments and outcomes within this course are aligned to portfolio components for the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential.

This course is offered in the Spring.

ECE 200 Creative and Expressive Arts (3)

This course emphasizes the importance of the arts as a foundation for expression in childhood. Students examine how to use art, music, dance, and drama to help children express and communicate their developing ideas, experiences, and feelings about themselves and the world. The development of the arts as process-driven over product-driven disciplines is evaluated and discussed.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

ECE 205 Language and Literacy Foundations (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

This course focuses on how language and literacy develop in the infant and toddler years with a study of best practices for enhancing and sustaining foundational skills. The teacher’s role in supporting language development and characteristics of a language-rich classroom are examined. An emphasis is placed on the importance of milestones of emergent literacy, use of children’s literature, and appropriate assessment of language and literacy development from birth through age 5. Psychological and socio-cultural factors affecting the development and acquisition of language and literacy are examined. A 40-hour field experience is required.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

ECE 214 Quality Care Environments for Infants and Toddlers (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

Course content includes theory and application of why and how to establish, organize, and modify early childhood learning environments to effectively meet the developmental needs of infants and toddlers. Focus is on the role of the teacher, integration of Pennsylvania Early Learning Standards, developmental assessment inventories, classroom design principles, and health and safety concerns as critical elements for providing quality care environments for infants and toddlers. A 40-hour field experience is required.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

ECE 222 Concepts and Methods: Language and Literacy Development (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

This course focuses on developing effective instructional strategies for teaching reading and literacy in pre-kindergarten through fourth grade. Research and standard-based understanding of instructional reading strategies, including traditional and holistic approaches, and the development of reading and writing assessments for a diverse population are emphasized as pre-service teachers learn how to facilitate children becoming independent readers and speakers. A 40-hour field experience is required.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

ECE 224 Concepts and Methods: Mathematical and Scientific Thinking (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

This course provides a conceptual framework, appropriate strategies, and methods in teaching mathematics and science in pre-kindergarten through fourth grade. Study includes appropriate standards and instructional goals to promote mathematical growth, the scientific method of inquiry, intellectual curiosity, and an investigative-learning mindset during the early childhood years in typical and atypical learners. The use of manipulatives and project-oriented inquiry will be explored and evaluated. A 40-hour field experience is required.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

ECE 228 Integrated Curriculum for Early Childhood Education (3)

Prerequisite(s): Field Experience Clearances, ECE 120

This course provides a conceptual framework for developing and implementing appropriate curricula for typical and atypical children. The relationships between instruction, curriculum, and assessment will be explored as guides to effective curricular planning at the instructional unit, age group, or grade level. The integration of content across multiple standards areas is stressed as pre-service teachers plan, adapt, and analyze curriculum content, instructional materials, and strategies to enhance learning. A 40-hour field experience is required.

This course is offered in the Spring.

ECE 230 Child Development: Birth to Age 5 (3)

A broad study of child development concepts, the course builds foundational knowledge of expected developmental milestones in cognitive, language, physical, and social-emotional domains from birth through age 5 in typical and atypical children. Study includes discussion of the impact of prenatal care and gestational experiences as well as contextual influences on child development.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of even calendar years.

Economics

ECN 220 Microeconomics (3)

This course develops the techniques necessary for an understanding of basic economics from a microeconomic standpoint. The specific topics explored include the concepts of scarcity (paucity), supply and demand, cost-production decision making, the operation of a firm in the product market under varying assumptions of competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly, and oligopoly, plus the operation of the firm in the factor market.

This course is offered in the Fall semesters of odd calendar years.

ECN 225 Macroeconomics (3)

This course develops tools for an understanding of macroeconomic issues and theory, including application to current social issues such as unemployment, economic growth, and inflation. The role of money and financial institutions is examined, along with the use and effectiveness of economic policy to control the macroeconomy.

This course is offered in the Spring of even calendar years.

English

ENG 115 Writing II (3)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 110

This course further develops effective written communication knowledge, skills, and abilities and progressively builds upon the concept of writing as a process and applies the concept to argumentative, analytical, and research writing required for upper-level college coursework across the curriculum. The course places a high emphasis on the use of digital library and technical resources, proper use of sources and citations, synthesis of source material, and advanced revision and editing skills.

This course is offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer.

ENG 110 Writing I (3)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for English

This course develops effective written communication knowledge, skills, and abilities by approaching writing as a process consciously controlled and changed by the writer to meet goals and objectives in various personal, academic, and professional contexts. This course progressively builds writing expertise from basic composition to argumentation with emphasis on organization, clarity, sentence structure and fluency, sensitivity to audience and purpose, and construction of a logical progression of ideas in development and support of an idea, opinion, or thesis.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

ENG 099 College Writing & Success Strategies (2)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for English

As a writing workshop to accompany ENG 110 Writing I, additional writing skill development and support featuring just-in-time instruction, additional guided writing practice, and targeted help overcoming non-cognitive barriers to developing college-level writing abilities are provided. This course provides supplementary instructional support and may not be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

ENG 090 College Reading & Success Strategies (2)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for English

This course develops effective strategies specifically helpful for reading non-fiction, informational college-level texts across the curriculum. Through specific skills instruction and guided practice, this reading intensive course helps students develop greater reading speed, comprehension, and retention of college-level texts. The course also provides specific skills instruction to develop study skills and habits necessary for students to effectively manage time and responsibilities in and out of the classroom. This course provides pre-college level instruction and support and may not be used to fulfill graduation requirements. This course may be taken prior to enrolling in ENG 110 or concurrently based on NPRC Placement Standards for English.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

ENG 220 Introduction to Literature (3)

Prerequisite(s): ENG 115

This course develops an appreciation of literature as it reflects human experience in diverse cultural contexts and an understanding of the essential elements of prose, drama, and poetry. Students will compare, contrast, and evaluate a variety of readings from different genres, time periods, and cultural contexts. Though multiple assessment measures may be used, students will be required to draw on research and writing skills from ENG 115 and the completion of a research paper will be required.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of even calendar years beginning 2022.

Fine Arts

FIN 250 Humanities Through the Arts Study-Away (3)

This course explores human values, attitudes, and ideas by examining the history and nature of creative expression representing a variety of art forms, which may include architecture, painting, sculpture, dance, film and video, photography, drama, music, and literature through an intensive travel experience. Students examine art forms from a variety of different time periods, cultural movements, and creators, incorporating the terms, processes, and tools used by artists. This course includes an educator-lead experiential learning program. Students will participate in open, appropriate, and effective interactions across cultures. An additional fee will apply to cover travel costs.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

FIN 105 Humanities Through the Arts (3)

This course explores human values, attitudes, and ideas by examining the history and nature of creative expression representing a variety of art forms including architecture, painting, sculpture, dance, film and video, photography, drama, music, and literature. Examines art forms from a variety of different time periods, cultural movements, and creators, incorporating the terms, processes, and tools used by artists.

This course is offered in the Fall.

FIN 110 Music Appreciation (3)

This course introduces students to music by examining the art form from a variety of different time periods, cultural movements, and creators incorporating the elements of music and the instrumentation used by musical artists. Explores the significance of surroundings and time periods and how they influenced and were influenced by the music of the day. Promotes enjoyment and understanding of music through use of recorded music and song literature.

This course is offered in the Spring.

Health

HLT 110 First Aid (2)

The purpose of this course is to train students to respond to potentially hazardous conditions in their environment, recognize emergencies, and make appropriate decisions for first aid care.

This course is offered in the Spring of even calendar years.

HLT 105 CPR/AED (1)

The Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider course is designed to teach cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills in a wide variety of settings. This course includes adult, child, pediatric CPR, and foreign-body airway obstruction. Barrier devices of various types will be taught. Early recognition and emergency actions in the event of a stroke, angina and/or heart attack along with the proper operation of an automated external defibrillation (AED) is essential. This class consists of actual hands-on practice with adult and child size mannequins so please dress appropriately for floor practice. Successful completion of the written and practical exams is required to obtain a two-year certification from the American Heart Association.

This course is offered in the Spring of even calendar years.

History

HST 110 History Without Borders (3)

This course surveys the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the Western World, the interactions of the West with other regions of the world, the regions of the Western World with each other, and how the West influences and is influenced by other regions of the world from the Seventeenth Century through the present.

This course is offered in the Spring and Summer.

Industrial Manufacturing Technology

IMT 280 Industrial Maintenance Capstone (3)

Prerequisite(s): IMT 250, IMT 265, IND 140

This capstone experience allows students an opportunity for real-world application by interacting directly with people already employed in their field of study. A culminating project incorporating concepts learned in IMT 250, IMT 265, and IND 140 is required.

This course is offered in the Spring beginning in 2022.

IMT 270 Maintenance Management (3)

This course explores techniques for analyzing failed components in industrial machinery and the investigation of causes of failure, including preventative maintenance tracking; oil analysis; failure analysis of components; warranty reporting considerations; record keeping; service writing; and communication with supervisors, vendors, and media.

This course is offered in the Spring beginning in 2022.

IMT 265 PLC and Robotics (4)

Prerequisite(s): IND 120

This course introduces programmable logic controllers (PLC) and their applications in process and industrial control systems with basic hardware and programming concepts progressing to system-level applications. The course prepares technicians to meet the needs of industry through a practical approach, covering PLC applications, maintenance, testing, and troubleshooting. This course also explores the foundations of robotics, robotics applications, and the analysis of robotics systems. This course includes a laboratory experience.

This course is offered in the Fall beginning in 2021.

IMT 250 High Voltage Industrial Systems (2)

Prerequisite(s): IND 120

This course explores the theory of high voltage electrical systems, including the use of protection devices for electrical systems of 600 volt or greater. Students examine system safety concerns, material handling and storage, and proper precautions and techniques for working on or near energized equipment. This course includes a laboratory experience.

This course is offered in the Fall beginning in 2021.

IMT 105 Process Technology (3)

This course introduces students to the concepts and techniques used in manufacturing facilities. The course systematically explores industry standards and processes and their effects on product quality and quality assurance. Students will examine variance of process operations due to chemistry, physics, maintenance duties, material handling. Troubleshooting techniques, environmental compliance, emergency response, and instrumentation are explored.

This course is offered in the Fall of even calendar years.

Industrial Technology

IND 140 Hydraulics and Pneumatics (3)

Prerequisite(s): IND 120

This course focuses on the safe operation and function of hydraulic and pneumatic systems, concentrating on pressures, flows, maintenance, oils and filters, schematic reading, pumps, fixed and variable displacement, load-sensing capabilities, control valves, pressure and flow control valves, actuators, and accumulators.

This course is offered in the Spring.

IND 120 Fundamentals of Electricity and Electronics (3)

This course concentrates on the theory and fundamental concepts of electricity and electronics and applies those concepts through hands-on exercises. Students study the use of instrumental and computational tools used in the electronics and electrical fields.

This course is offered in the Spring.

IND 115 Metrology and Measuring Instruments (3)

Prerequisite(s): MTH 120 or MTH 150

In this course, students gain familiarity with tools and equipment used in the field of metrology. Students are introduced to techniques employed to accomplish tasks including interpreting technical drawings, symbols, proportions, and tolerances; applying specifications to manufactured parts and verifying accuracy; verifying areal profile surface texture, extraction and filtration; interpreting data, datum references, and the datum feature triangle. ANSI/ASME Y14.5M-2009 and ISO 9001 standards employed.

This course is offered in the Spring.

IND 100 Industrial Safety (3)

This course will discuss safety concerns as they apply to crane and rigging safety, electrical safety, environmental concerns, ergonomics issues, fire safety, hazardous materials handling and safety, OSHA approved lockout/tagout procedures, personal protective equipment needs, working at heights, general safety, and safety management. A 16-hour field experience or alternate video review is required.

This course is offered in the Fall.

Mathematics

MTH 120 Foundations of Math (3)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course promotes interpretation and communication of quantitative information presented in verbal, symbolic, graphical, or numerical form and the ability to draw conclusions about and make decisions with quantitative information. An understanding of mathematical and statistical concepts is built through the development of number sense and problem-solving skills as applied to financial literacy, mathematical perspective, logical reasoning, linear and exponential models, conversions, descriptive statistics, probability, and data.

This course is offered in the Spring and Summer.

MTH 090 Math & College Reasoning Strategies (2)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course provides just-in-time instruction of fundamental skills and concepts in problem-solving and general mathematics. The course promotes perseverance to excellence in problem-solving; establishes connections between concepts involving interpretation and communication of quantitative information; bridges gaps between previously learned material and new concepts; and encourages engagement in productive struggle in building mathematical skills and abilities in mathematical and statistical reasoning and application of that reasoning to career and technical programs. The course encourages consistent use of correct mathematical procedures and recognition of when and how to apply skills learned in unfamiliar situations. The course provides pre-college level instruction and support and may not be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

MTH 095 Algebra and College Reasoning Strategies (2)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course provides just-in-time instruction of fundamental algebraic skills and concepts in support of MTH 130 course objectives. The course promotes perseverance to excellence in problem-solving; establishes connections between concepts; bridges gaps between previously learned material and new concepts; and encourages engagement in productive struggle in building mathematical skills and abilities in college algebra. The course follows a cyclical approach that encourages consistent use of correct mathematical procedures and recognition of when and how to apply skills learned in unfamiliar situations. The course provides pre-college level instruction and support and may not be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

This course is offered in the Fall.

MTH 125 Introduction to Statistics (3)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course develops problem-solving and decision-making skills by applying concepts related to descriptive measures, elementary probability, and fundamental statistical inference procedures including estimation and hypothesis testing to a variety of situations with wide applications. The course explores statistical concepts including random sampling, confidence interval estimation, chi-square testing, regression analysis and correlation, and analysis of variance.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

MTH 130 College Algebra (3)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course promotes interpretation and communication of relationships and functions presented in verbal, symbolic, graphical, or numerical form. An understanding of algebraic concepts and the ability to apply algebraic skills and reasoning to linear, quadratic, cubic, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions is developed using modeling, algebraic manipulation, and exploration of data to determine the solution set for equations and inequalities and their associated systems with and without the use of technology. The course explores conic sections from the perspective of pattern recognition with focus on graphing and application to solving nonlinear systems of equations and inequalities. The course develops basic understanding of matrix operations and the use of matrix concepts to solve linear systems.

This course is offered in the Fall.

MTH 150 Applied Math (3)

Prerequisite(s): See NPRC Placement Standards for Mathematics

This course promotes interpretation and communication of quantitative information and the ability to draw conclusions about and make decisions with quantitative information. Problem-solving strategies and project-based scenarios are employed to build an understanding of basic mathematical, algebraic, and geometric concepts, develop number sense, and cultivate reasoning skills fundamental to success in career and technical programs in applied science.

This course is offered in the Fall.

Philosophy

PHL 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

This course examines the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence beginning with the dawn of philosophical awareness among the ancient Greek philosophers. Traditional and modern approaches to the understanding of the human condition are incorporated with consideration given to the importance of skepticism and critical reasoning in human affairs. The relationship between certainty, belief, and doubt is explored, and the boundaries of human knowledge is examined.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

Physics

PHY 150 Applied Physics (3)

This course establishes foundational principles and processes of physics from a conceptual and applied approach. Using large-scale and small-scale perspectives, the basic concepts of measurement, motion, forces, energy transformation and transfer processes, heat, electricity, magnetism, and wave properties associated with sound and light are examined.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

PHY 151 Applied Physics Lab (1)

Prerequisite(s): PHY 150

This course investigates the foundational principles and processes of physics through a broad range of laboratory activities and experiments designed to explore how measurement, motion, forces, energy transformation and transfer processes, heat, electricity, magnetism, and wave properties associated with sound and light relate to the physical world.

This course is offered in the Spring semester of odd calendar years.

Political Science

POL 110 Government & Politics (3)

This course examines the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. The course explores the content and application of the Constitution and identifies the duties of, and interactions between, the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government. The course analyzes politics, the political process, and political events including the roles played by, and stances of, political parties and interest groups. The course explores the relationship of individual values to political views and develops the ability to formulate and articulate one’s own political views.

This course is offered in the Fall and Summer.

Psychology

PSY 210 Human Development (3)

Prerequisite(s): PSY 110

This course investigates the theories and research findings related to the understanding of complex behavior as it evolves throughout the lifespan.

This course is offered in the Spring and Summer.

PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology (3)

Students study the mental processes and behavior of the individual and examine psychological phenomena including development, intelligence, personality, emotion, memory, perception, learning, abnormal behavior, language, and behavior as influenced by biological and social factors.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

Religion

REL 110 World Religions (3)

This course is an introduction to the major tenets and cultural expressions of a diverse range of major eastern and western world religions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism Judaism, Native American traditions, and Taoism. Religions are compared and contrasted thematically, structurally, and culturally. Interdependence of politics, religion, and culture throughout the world is also explored.

This course is offered in the Spring of odd calendar years.

Social Work

SWK 230 Human Diversity (3)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 105, SOC 110

This course celebrates human differences, developing an appreciation of diversity and multiculturalism. It also examines the impact of discrimination and inequality on specific and generalized groups in the U.S. The course will examine the responses offered by specific fields of study as well as by the larger society and segments of that society as they relate to discrimination and inequality. Course includes exploration of methods of celebrating differences.

This course is offered in the Spring.

SWK 225 Social Problems, Services, and Issues (3)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 105, SOC 110

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the historical development of social welfare policy in the United States. It provides students with an opportunity to explore career choices through study of, and interactions with, area human service delivery organizations. This course requires a 20-hour service-learning experience.

This course is offered in the Fall.

SWK 215 Human Behavior and the Social Environment III (3)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 210

This course focuses on ways in which drugs and alcohol impact the individual. It examines the major human biological systems with a special emphasis on understanding the brain as affected by drugs and alcohol and provides the student with a broad understanding and insight into the use and abuse of drugs within American society and their impact upon society in general.

This course is offered in the Spring.

SWK 105 Introduction to Social Work (3)

This course gives the student an opportunity to learn about social work. Students examine common human needs and the services which meet them. Values and issues related to social work and the roles assumed by social workers and related helping professionals in the social service delivery system are explored.

This course is offered in the Fall.

SWK 205 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 105, PSY 110

In this course, students begin to study the person from a biopsychosocial perspective. Students focus on the social environment and apply theoretical frameworks in order to put human behavior into perspective, looking first at the individual from a biological perspective. Next students examine development of the self. This course examines the impact of culture, the physical environment and social institutions in shaping human behavior. Students begin to see how social systems impact individual health and well-being.

This course is offered in the Spring.

SWK 210 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3)

Prerequisite(s): SWK 205

This course focuses on the person in his/her environment across the life span. Biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural variables that influence development are identified across the life cycle. This course addresses the impact of various systems on human behaviors as well as issues of discrimination and social/economic justice.

This course is offered in the Fall.

Sociology

SOC 251 Introduction to Sociology Study-Away (3)

This course emphasizes the systematic study of human social activity with focus on the characteristics of human group life as it relates to the structure of the social environments, institutions, and organizations and their influences on the individual as well as the manner individuals shape the group life of the social environments, institutions, and organizations to which they belong. It also develops a greater capacity to assess, interpret, and evaluate the social world. This course culminates in an educator-lead experiential learning program. Students will participate in meaningful conversations as they engage in open, appropriate, and effective interactions across cultures, further contributing to the development of their global competencies. An additional fee will apply to cover travel costs.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

SOC 250 Cultural Diversity Study-Away with Community Service (3)

This course emphasizes the study of human social activity with a focus on the characteristics of human group life and the reciprocal relationship between the social environment and the individual. The course develops the student’s ability to assess, interpret, and evaluate cultures through an educator-lead travel experience with a community service component. Students will participate in open and appropriate interactions across cultures. An additional fee will apply to cover travel costs.

The semester in which this course is offered is to be determined.

SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology (3)

This course emphasizes the systematic study of human social activity with focus on the characteristics of human group life as it relates to the structure of the social environments, institutions, and organizations and their influences on the individual as well as the manner individuals shape the group life of the social environments, institutions, and organizations to which they belong. It also develops a greater capacity to assess, interpret, and evaluate the social world.

This course is offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer.

SOC 150 Diversity in the Workplace (3)

This course examines issues related to growing diversity in the workplace as a reflection of cultural, cognitive, and physical diversity involving differing languages, religions, races, sexual orientations, genders, ages, and ethnicities of employees and those they encounter in interactions with those served by the place of employment. The course analyzes diversity issues related to demographics, socioeconomic status, education levels, access and legitimacy, discrimination and fairness, relevant legislation, and values questions from multiple perspectives. Students develop the ability to identify, avoid, or mitigate the effects of discrimination and harassment, prejudice, unconscious and conscious bias, and stereotyping to promote improved group communication, productivity, and satisfaction in the workplace.

This course is offered in the Fall semester of odd calendar years.

Speech

SPC 105 Interpersonal Communication (3)

This course introduces students to the basic theories of interpersonal communication and develops communication skills necessary for success in a variety of personal and professional contexts. This course also increases students’ understanding of relationship stages and types, self-concept formation, and aspects that influence interpersonal communication such as power and conflict.

This course is offered in the Spring and Summer.

SPC 110 Public Speaking (3)

This course introduces fundamental principles and practices of effective verbal communication in a variety of contexts involving public speaking. Students develop knowledge, skills, and abilities in voice production, nonverbal communication, confidence, and poise necessary to produce optimal verbal presentations. The course cultivates improved listening and interviewing skills and the ability to appropriately respond to verbal communication in a variety of public settings and incorporates the use of technology in required verbal presentations.

This course is offered in the Fall.